ElenorSays

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Movies You Should Know: Trans* and Non-Binary Films

Today, on the twentieth anniversary of Brandon Teena’s death, we take a moment to realize how far our community has come and how far we still have to go. In an effort to increase visibility, we wanted to post an updated list of films from the last ten years dealing with trans* and non-binary visibility.

1. The Aggressives (2005). A documentary look at women who prefer to dress and act as men and who participate in NYC’s predominantly African-American lesbian drag balls. [You can watch it online HERE]

2. Normal (2003). A Midwestern father announces his plan to have a sex change operation. 

3. Tomboy (2011). A 10-year-old girl, settling into her new neighborhood outside Paris, is mistaken for a boy and has to live up to this new identity since it’s too late for the mistake to be clarified. [Full movie available for rent on Amazon Instant Video]

 4. A Girl Like Me: The Gwen Araujo Story (2006). The true story of Gwen Araujo, a young transgendered woman who was brutally murdered by four men in 2002.

5. Sex My Life (2008). This Persian independent film tells the story of seven Iranian transsexuals living in Tehran who live pieces of their own lives on the screen. Original title was “Khastegi.”

6. XXY (2007). This is the dramatic story of a 15-year-old intersex girl. She lives with her parents, who have to cope with the challenges of her medical condition.

7. Red Without Blue (2007). The intimate bond between two identical twin brothers is challenged when one decides to transition from male to female; this is the story of their evolving relationship, and the resurrection of their family from a darker past.

8. Romeos (2011). A drama centered on the relationship between a young man and a transsexual who is transitioning from female to male.

vizzz:

(10 trans women who were killed by hate crimes. the other 10 are located here)

(via praxis-makesperfect-deactivated)

liquorinthefront:

A Series Of Questions

This ongoing body of work explores the power dynamics inherent in the questions asked of transgender, transsexual, genderqueer, gender non-conforming, and gender-variant people.

See more photos here.

(via callmequell)

Kony 2012

A world in which a project like this succeeds is a world worth living in. I support this movement 100%. #KONY2012 - http://vimeo.com/m/37119711

alchymista:

The Straw That Can Save Lives
Danish water purification company Vestergaard Frandsen’s latest development could very possibly save millions of lives of those who struggle to find and produce clean water.
Their invention is the LifeStraw, a low-tech, low-hassle personal water filter that enables the user to simply stick one end into a water source of questionable cleanliness, such as a river, and suck. Several layers within the straw manage to filter out 99% of bacteria and viruses. Previously, people of areas with little clean water would be forced to boil water to ensure its safety, using up other resources in the process. With this invention, little maintenance would be required, and it could last for a year or two.
In addition to the personal filter, the company has developed a LifeStraw Family, which uses gravity rather than suction to filter water. By hanging this up in their homes and filling it with water, families would be able to open the bottom for clean, safe water.
These products do, however, have their limitations. While 99% of pathogens are removed, the filter is unable to prevent Giardia Lamblia from entering the filtered water, as this particular parasite is too small for the filters. The company is diligently working on a solution to this problem. Another potential problem is availability, since Vestergaard Frandsen is a small, struggling company that cannot quite afford to give out too many handouts.
Hopefully these problems can be overcome, as this product, in its current state, and especially once perfected, has the potential for aiding many who need it most.
      (Sources 1 & 2)

alchymista:

The Straw That Can Save Lives

Danish water purification company Vestergaard Frandsen’s latest development could very possibly save millions of lives of those who struggle to find and produce clean water.

Their invention is the LifeStraw, a low-tech, low-hassle personal water filter that enables the user to simply stick one end into a water source of questionable cleanliness, such as a river, and suck. Several layers within the straw manage to filter out 99% of bacteria and viruses. Previously, people of areas with little clean water would be forced to boil water to ensure its safety, using up other resources in the process. With this invention, little maintenance would be required, and it could last for a year or two.

In addition to the personal filter, the company has developed a LifeStraw Family, which uses gravity rather than suction to filter water. By hanging this up in their homes and filling it with water, families would be able to open the bottom for clean, safe water.

These products do, however, have their limitations. While 99% of pathogens are removed, the filter is unable to prevent Giardia Lamblia from entering the filtered water, as this particular parasite is too small for the filters. The company is diligently working on a solution to this problem. Another potential problem is availability, since Vestergaard Frandsen is a small, struggling company that cannot quite afford to give out too many handouts.

Hopefully these problems can be overcome, as this product, in its current state, and especially once perfected, has the potential for aiding many who need it most.

      (Sources 1 & 2)

(via praxis-makesperfect-deactivated)

coolchicksfromhistory:

January 27th is International Holocaust Remembrance Day

The Remember Me? Project

The US Holocaust Memorial Museum has over 1,000 photos of children displaced by World War II which they are trying to connect to survivors.  The Museum hopes to collect stories about these children and their post-war lives.  A small number of photos have been connected to survivors already.  

The six girls pictured above have not yet been found: Jeanine Cohen, Rosa BerenblumMicheline SuhamiMathilde ErlichMiryam Dzialowski, and Eva Steiner.

Why I’m Not Saying “Tr*nny” And I’d Like It If You Guys Didn’t Either, Please.
Why I’m Not Saying “Tr*nny” And I’d Like It If You Guys Didn’t Either, Please.

www.originalplumbing.com

Trans brothers, dear dear dear men, whom I respect and look up to and adore, allow me to quote noted gender theorist Inigo Montoya:

You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

I’m writing this because there’s been tons of talk about this slur recently. Trans men, some of them high profile, using tr*nny, trans women calling them on it, trans men demanding that they have a right to say it, et cetera. So before I start the serious stuff, I want to say that I’m not who you should listen to. This is really a trans women’s issue. You should listen to trans women. But they are already talking, and from your reactions, it’s clear we need to talk about this. From one trans guy to a bunch of others.

I’m not mad, guys. Well, ok, I’m a little mad. But mostly I just want to help fix this. We’ve made some bad mistakes. I used to use this word too, and I own that. I fucked up. We fucked up. Now let’s work to make this better.

Tr*nny is a slur. I think we’ve all agreed on that. Diverse sources, from Julia Serano to Kelly Osbourne, all agree. But for whom is it a slur? We know what image is summoned when we hear n*gger–a Black body. When we hear fag–a queer male body. When we hear d*ke–a queer female body. These words evoke certain identities. There are clear images associated with them. Fags are effeminate. D*kes are too masculine to be proper women. What clear image is evoked by tr*nny?

You know as well as I do: it’s the image of a trans woman. A “male” body, or rather, a body doctors would assign as male, in women’s clothing. A person attempting–and always failing, in these images–to be female. That’s what the image has historically been, and with only a few tiny changes, that’s what the image is now.

Whenever I have this debate, I suggest people google “tr*nny.” I stand by that suggestion. Click over the image tab and you’ll see trans women and drag queens galore, a few car parts, and fabulously enough, a picture of Kate Bornstein with a photoshopped mermaid’s tail, but almost never a trans man. When you do see trans men online associated with the slur, they’re almost always calling themselves tr*nnies. They’re not having the word pinned on them by cis people. This distinction is excruciatingly important.

The fact that cis people don’t call trans men tr*nnies very often illuminates two important things about trans male experience: the degree to which are and have been invisible, and what a weird place we stand in as female-assigned men in a patriarchal world.

The invisibility is a big part of what’s scary about being a trans man. We’re so unspeakable that there isn’t even a common word used to degrade exclusively us. When we look into history for gender variant people, we see trans women, and we see this word used against them. We see few trans men, and just like those historical trans men are mostly invisible, so are the structures of oppression used to keep them down.

Reclaiming tr*nny feels like a way to have a history. But that word was never our history. It feels like a way to name and confront those invisible oppressive structures. But it doesn’t do that work, because while the structures that oppress trans women have many elements in common with the ones that oppress us, they’re not the exact same ones.

That’s because, like I said, trans men are in such a weird position in relation to patriarchy. To the patriarchal eye, we seem to following the sexist imperative that being a man is better than being a woman, which of course the patriarchy is all for. But we’re doing it by violating another central patriarchal imperative: that people with vaginas are women.

So we move through this sexist world in a peculiar manner–able to wield our male privilege when we’re allowed to function as men, but subject to a particularly painful brand of transphobic and homophobic sexism when we’re understood as women.

Sure, sometimes trans guys get called tr*nny. But let’s please be real: It’s not that often, and it’s a recent phenomenon. Maybe we’ll get to the point where it’s a common enough slur against trans men that we can start to have the reclamation conversation. But man, I hope we don’t. It’s depressing and comical, us wanting our very own slur.

Sure, you might have a trans woman friend who doesn’t mind you calling yourself a tr*nny. This is because women, like men, don’t always agree with one another!

Sure, you may be very attached to the word “tr*nny” as a part of your identity. You can identify as anything you want! But if it is absolutely imperative for you to use that word, and you using that word makes trans women feel unsafe around you, I’m not sure what to tell you. Maybe you should do some work within yourself, trying to discover why you have such an intense need to own a word that makes people feel unsafe. All of which is to say that, ultimately, your identity is your identity, but you don’t need to share all of it with everyone if it makes them feel unsafe.

Raise your hand if you’re a young white trans guy who went/goes to a liberal arts college and is reading this on his Macbook. (My hand is raised.) Please know that most people who get tr*nny used against them on a daily basis are poor trans women of color. Please try to remember that working to include poor trans women of color in our movement is like, one of the most important things we need to do right now.

Which is more important, working to make trans women feel comfortable and safe in our community, or using a word that makes us feel all tingly and transgressive?

Resist transmisogyny. You do not need someone else’s slur to connect with your own history. Stop using that word. I don’t think it means what you think it means.

by Stephen Ira on January 23, 2012

motherjones:

coolchicksfromhistory:

Joan Trumpauer Mulholland, 1961.
Joan, a 19 year old Freedom Rider, was sentenced to two months in prison for her involvement in the integration of a Jackson, Mississippi bound train.  She served more than the required two months because each addition day reduced her $200 fine by $3.
In the Fall of 1961, Joan transferred from Duke University to historically black Tougaloo Southern Christian College because she felt integration should be a two way street.  
Today Joan is a retired teaching assistant living in Virginia and mother to five sons.  After the 2008 election she brought her Obama pin to the grave of Medgar Evers.  

Everything about this.

motherjones:

coolchicksfromhistory:

Joan Trumpauer Mulholland, 1961.

Joan, a 19 year old Freedom Rider, was sentenced to two months in prison for her involvement in the integration of a Jackson, Mississippi bound train.  She served more than the required two months because each addition day reduced her $200 fine by $3.

In the Fall of 1961, Joan transferred from Duke University to historically black Tougaloo Southern Christian College because she felt integration should be a two way street. 

Today Joan is a retired teaching assistant living in Virginia and mother to five sons.  After the 2008 election she brought her Obama pin to the grave of Medgar Evers.  

Everything about this.

Until you’re watchin’ every move that I make, You gotta believe that I got what it takes, To Stand Out, above the crowd, Even if I gotta shout out loud!'Til mine is the only face you see, Gonna stand out, ‘til you notice me!

Until you’re watchin’ every move that I make,
You gotta believe that I got what it takes,

To Stand Out, above the crowd,
Even if I gotta shout out loud!

'Til mine is the only face you see,
Gonna stand out, ‘til you notice me!

(Source: amandakarrin, via akieag-deactivated20140427)

10 Handsome Men (Who Were Born Female)

These ten men are all successful, handsome, and accomplished in their chosen fields. They were also all born as women!



Balian Buschbaum was born in 1980 as Yvonne Buschbaum, and he is a former German pole vaulter. Though he was the second best female pole vaulter in Germany, in 2007 Buschbaum announced his retirement due to a persistent injury. He also expressed his desire to begin gender reassignment therapy. In 2008 he officially changed his name and underwent gender reassignment surgery to become a man. (Link | Photo)

Loren Rex Cameron is an American photographer, author and transsexual activist. His work includes portraiture and self-portraiture which consist of lesbian and transsexual bodies; he documented his own physiological transition from female to male. Cameron’s photography captures images of the transsexual body that “provide an affirming visual resource for transgendered people and to demystify the transsexual body for the non-transgendered viewer.” (Link | Via)

Check out the rest here: http://www.oddee.com/item_98038.aspx

10 Gorgeous Women (Who Were Born Male)

Many people don’t realize that transsexual models are popping up in magazines and on runways everywhere. These gorgeous models look and feel like women but were born with male reproductive organs. If we didn’t know, we definitely wouldn’t be able to tell that they weren’t born female! Could you?



Sri Lankan model Chamila (AKA Chami) Asanka is an up-and-comer in the world fashion industry. She was also a 2011 contestant in the Miss International Queen pageant. (Link | Photo)

Hard to believe that Claudia Charriez was born a man, right? Her transsexuality has not stopped her from becoming an international model. Charriez was kicked off of America’s Next Top Model and The Janice Dickinson Modeling Agency TV shows in 2008, but went on to win the America’s Next Top Transsexual Model contest on The Tyra Banks Show later that year. (Link | Photo)

Check the rest out here: http://www.oddee.com/item_98035.aspx

sangreyhuesos:

ohshitgetfit:

9 times out of 10 i just put on a big coat or sweatshirt and go bra-less lolz

I hear this all the time.

sangreyhuesos:

ohshitgetfit:

9 times out of 10 i just put on a big coat or sweatshirt and go bra-less lolz

I hear this all the time.

(via ladreamsmasher)